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Liturgy Too Structured For Most Evangelicals

Church Life

The general consensus among most evangelicals is that the traditional liturgical format followed by most mainline churches is too structured and repetitious for the Spirit of God to be present and at work.

“It’s the same thing every week,” seems to be the mantra of those who have a distaste for liturgy.

Others say things like: “You always know what is going to happen next.” “It’s like no room is scheduled in the service for God to move.” and “I like more of a freedom in worship than liturgy allows.”

In order to avoid this repetition and to avoid quenching the Spirit, these generally attend what is considered a more Spirit-filled type of service. What does this type of worship service look like, you might ask?

We asked Pastor Tommy Fredricks of The Church of Heaven’s Elevator in Cherokee, Iowa what his service looks like.

“To avoid a service that is overly structured, here’s what we do:

 

We plan a service where we sing for 30-45 minutes, we do announcements and receive an offering while special music is played, then we preach for 30-40 minutes, give an altar call and pray for anyone that comes forward and then dismiss the service.

 

“The following week we sing for 30-45 minutes, we do announcements and receive an offering while special music is played, then we preach for 30-40 minutes, give an altar call and pray for anyone that comes forward and then dismiss the service.

 

“Next, we might do a service where we sing for 30-45 minutes, we do announcements and receive an offering while special music is played, then we preach for 30-40 minutes, give an altar call and pray for anyone that comes forward and then dismiss the service.

 

“On the first Sunday of every month we throw in a Communion service to really mix things up (if we remember), but otherwise we sing for 30-45 minutes, we do announcements and receive an offering while special music is played, then we preach for 30-40 minutes, give an altar call and pray for anyone that comes forward and then dismiss the service.”

I guess, somehow, one man’s structure and repetition are more spiritual than another man’s structure and repetition.

Let me put it this way: one man’s structure and repetition are more spiritual than another man’s structure and repetition.

Or even: one man’s structure and repetition are more spiritual than another man’s structure and repetition . . .

Reporter: Dr Parson Peeves

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